The Glass Castle.

November 10, 2007 at 9:38 pm 8 comments

 

 

 

 

the-glass-castle.jpg(Sorry about that weird space)

One of my co-workers was tired of listening to me whine about having nothing to read, so she loaned me this memoir, The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls.

Memoirs aren’t generally my genre of choice, but I’ve enjoyed a couple of the comedic variety– Dress Your Family in Corduroy & Denim and Hypocrite in a Pouffy White Dress. I expressly recommend both.

This particular story is that of a girl with an alcoholic father. I know, red flag– an overtly depressing tale of children hurt and confused by their Dr. Jekyll/Mr. Hyde of a father. However, the author looks young and attractive enough in her photo (not homely or fat) and is apparently a ‘regular contributor to MSNBC’, which I read sometimes. The book was also awarded 2005 Readers Prize by Elle magazine.

The quote on the front is “Walls has joined the company of writers such as Mary Karr and Frank McCourt, who have been able to transform their sad memories into fine art.” –People. Frank McCourt, the author of Angela’s Ashes? I think that’s Victor’s great uncle. Sad memories… fine art… Blah. For some reason, I’ve never particularly relished sad memories of mine or other people.

The first sentence of the book reads:
“I was sitting in a taxi, wondering if I had overdressed for the evening, when I looked out the window and saw Mom rooting through a Dumpster.”

Okay, lady, you’ve me intrigued… but I’m distracted by the arbitrary capitalization of ‘dumpster’. I’ll let you guys know how it turns out.

 

 

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I’m not kidding… Water/paint.

8 Comments Add your own

  • 1. victor  |  November 11, 2007 at 3:11 am

    Excellent post indeed.

    Reply
  • 2. grindchopblend  |  November 11, 2007 at 12:25 pm

    It’s a good book. Sad memoirs are fine if there is a hopeful message too. I tell you this as your blogging librarian friend. My favorite memoir of a ruined childhood, survived brilliantly, is Blackbird: A Childhood Lost and Found, by Jennifer Lauck.

    Reply
  • 3. victor  |  November 11, 2007 at 3:30 pm

    ps: You might be interested in knowing that I may or may not start a blog again – I’m not sure. Every time I’m bored I think, “Huh, maybe I should make a website”. Today was no exception. I think it looks nice. Go look!

    Reply
  • 4. aclare  |  November 12, 2007 at 12:30 am

    Whoopsies. One of my professors used to print ‘example assignments’ in Latin so we wouldn’t get distracted from the format criteria. You were doing the same thing? I like the layout. It’s very nice. I like how you tell me what you’re listening too. I didn’t know you liked the Fratellis. Molly does too!

    Cannot wait to read more…

    Love you!! You’re not a bastard child!… As far as I know. I’ve yet to verify your father’s existence….

    Reply
  • 5. arduous  |  November 12, 2007 at 11:27 am

    Arbitrary capitalization bugs me too. And I’m not a huge memoire person- I find they often slip into self-indulgence. Then again, I have a blog which is kind of the height of self-indulgence.

    I’ll be interested to learn if you end up liking the book.

    Reply
  • 6. Samson  |  November 15, 2007 at 12:43 pm

    Egad! Heaven forbid you read anything written by somebody who’s fat and homely. Those kind of people don’t know anything. Attractive people, on the other hand, are awesome.

    Reply
  • 7. aclare  |  November 16, 2007 at 7:32 am

    Exactly.

    Reply
  • 8. holly hobbie  |  November 16, 2007 at 1:49 pm

    Dumpster is a proper noun, copyrighted by Dempsey Dumpster, the company that makes them. It requires capitalization.

    Reply

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Why can't they say what they want?

Why can't they just say what they mean?

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